Anchor for this item  posted Friday, February 07, 2003 at 4:47 PM MST

spaceflight.nasa will be carrying "cartoons" of the shuttle's left wing, intended to show those sensors that have been significant to date, i.e. it does not show all sensors, but rather those that failed (out of range low) and or reported increased temperature. Salient are wire routings, i.e. sensors failed in a sequence, and that sequence is a substantial set of fault indications; that set will be questionned in order to derive what happened and where. (If there were only a single spot where all the cables came together [this is not the case], then it would be strongly compelling to suspect an event at that spot.)
Included on this page is a photograph of "the underside of Columbia during its entry from mission STS-107 on Feb. 1, 2003, as it passed by the Starfire Optical Range [...] Kirtland Air Force Base, N. M. The image was taken at approximately 7:57 a.m. CST (1357 GMT)"


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Well ain't this fun ... the friggin' archives are still there, at least for the moment. (Did I save them? Do dawgs poop on lawns?!) Apparently it's just that blogspot's archive script has lost its mind.
Ever neat! blogspot.com just lost 3 weeks of my archives. Again, and especially with free services: they're worth precisely what I paid!!

What a bunch of CRAP!!

Enron software!


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Even though many users are switching to broadband, BBC | Tech reports that "Internet access hits the wall" A spokesperson for Jupiter research predicts it will continue to grow slowly to around 51% in 2007. "But there is always going to be a digital divide with a significant chunk of the population who don't want to get online," said Mr Stevenson.
Digital divide ... yaa. Those who already have get more, and those who have not lose even that which they think they have. *I didn't just come up with that, did I?*


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Addend to M$ Slammer stuff: UK security specialist says his code was used in Slammer worm - smh.com.au ... now, aint' that a kick in the head?!
Litchfield said he was now questioning the benefits of publishing proof of concept code. "Some will argue that full disclosure is a good thing. Others will abhor it. There is no one correct answer - it must be a personal decision and for the moment I am undecided."
Uhhh ... yaa. Ya, I think that makes good sense. Jumping to conclusions, like initiating war, can and likely will have the effect of foreclosing future options.


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Anchor for this item  posted Tuesday, February 04, 2003 at 3:17 PM MST

www.nasa.gov/columbia/ - Space Shuttle Columbia and Her Crew - "this page will collect and distribute information about the crew, the flight, and the ongoing investigation."

As you can imagine, NASA servers are getting pounded. A very intelligent set of resources is published on NASA Television and on NASA TV on the Web. (One feeds that's holding up very well is that from JPL ... perhaps they're used to getting pounded? This one and the other traditional feeds are consistenly better than those posted more recently.)
NB: Since 99.5% of coverage is talking head stuff, I've set RealAudio connection to 14.4 ... not only is my feed uninterrupted, but my load is roughly 1/6th that of those sucking down 80KB or whatever. When I'm not viewing RA, I feed from KSC's nasatv.ra audio feed at 8.5KB ... again, without interruption, but this time at nearly 1/10th the pull. (Look to see who's maximizing their own share ... /that's/ someone you don't want on your team.)


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Anchor for this item  posted Monday, February 03, 2003 at 10:19 PM MST

Data harvesting for Columbia investigation: NASA has arranged for anonymous FTP upload - Instructions for Uploading Images and Video Related to the Columbia Accident


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Anchor for this item  posted Sunday, February 02, 2003 at 3:25 PM MST

From today's NASA JSC daily briefing - first thermal spike was in the wheel well: 20-30 degrees rise in five minutes; 8:54 left mid-fuselage 60 degree increase over five minutes (right side increased 15); 8:58 roll trim increase in left elevon, indicating an increase in drag; measurements fail for wheel well area and back; 8:59 roll trim increase, indicating counter to increased drag on the left; loss of signal.
Data recovery may yield as much as 32secs of additional information. (Records are validated real-time; those that fail are not displayed. Data that failed strict real-time criteria is on hand.)

NB: Updated contact data for transmittal of digital images: columbiaimages@nasa.gov

Real feeds: nasa_tv; nasatv; nasatv2; nasatv ames, kscnasa, jpl live, and *!use this!* nasatv audio. (JPL has a 512K feed ... I cannot receive it [Hey! 28.8 SLIrP!!] so do not know its contents.)

[I have left www.unitedspacealliance.com/ off the list; at 6dB in the red for the duration, audio is inexcusably poor.]


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